Histology Methods For Studying Diseased Tissue Microenvironments

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Histology has a crucial role to play throughout the drug discovery and development pipeline, from early-stage R&D through to clinical trials.

The tissue microenvironment plays a critical role in regulating disease. To develop targeted therapies, it is vitally important to study these pathogenic niches, to identify the cellular and molecular abnormalities driving disease. The understanding gained in these studies helps us make the best decisions for drug design and dose selection.

Powerful multiplex staining modalities targeting protein and mRNA can be used to interrogate, visualize, and quantify cell phenotype and spatial relationships within tissues.

In this webinar, Dr Ross Dobie will describe how staining techniques, including multiplex immunofluorescence staining (mIF) and in situ hybridization for mRNA (RNAscope), are providing crucial insights into disease pathogenesis and aiding drug discovery in the fields of fibrosis and immuno-oncology.

He will also discuss case studies that showcase how Concept Life Science's Histology is set up to design and run these specialized staining techniques to deliver high-quality, quantifiable data.

Speakers

  • Dr Ross Dobie - Senior Scientist, Malvern Panalytical

More information

Who should attend? 

  • Pharmaceutical scientists working on immunotherapy drug discovery, fibrosis drug discovery, neuroscience
  • Clinical researchers working on immunotherapy drug discovery, fibrosis drug discovery, neuroscience
  • Academic researchers immunotherapy drug discovery, fibrosis drug discovery, neuroscience

What will you learn? 

  • You will learn about a range of histology techniques available for visualising and quantifying protein and mRNA expression
  • You will learn about multiplex immunofluorescence (IF) and RNAscope
  • You will learn about histology workflows
  • You will see practical case studies which describe how these workflows can be designed to inform drug discovery in the fields of fibrosis and immuno-oncology