Willis and Duncan course: Understanding X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, 1 or 2 weeks

Malvern Panalytical has acquired the rights to the renowned ‘Willis and Duncan’ course. Professors James Willis and Andy Duncan began the course in 1974 at the University of Cape Town (South Africa). Since 1990 the course has also been run at the University of Western Ontario (London, Canada). The Willis +amp;amp; Duncan course has evolved constantly, keeping up with the latest developments. This unique program provides participants with thorough understanding of the principles and practice of X-ray fluorescence analysis. The emphasis will be on the application of the XRF technique to trace element analysis in geological materials using wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The operating principles of the instrumentation will be explained and illustrated in detail, as well as how to select the optimum measurement parameters. Additional topics covered are sample preparation, matrix correction methods and a short introduction to energy dispersive spectrometry.

The course materials include ‘Understanding XRF Spectrometry’ (a two-volume book by James Willis and Andrew Duncan) together with lecture handouts, notes, binders with the exercises and other useful documentation. The content of the course and its presentation is vendor neutral. It is NOT a course on the instrumentation or software of a particular vendor.

Participants completing the course should be in a much stronger position to understand XRF as an analytical technique and successfully carry out XRF analysis.

The following aspects will be covered during the course:
• Introduction to the fundamentals of XRF
• Qualitative analysis
• Selection and setting of instrumental parameters
• Matrix effects
• Sample preparation
• Quantitative XRF analysis for major and trace levels
• Background and line overlap corrections
• Mass absorption coefficients and the relation to Compton radiation

During the registration process, you will be asked whether you want to attend a one- or two-weeks course (two weeks for a more in-depth course).