Date recorded: August 17 2021

The efficacy of RNA-based vaccines has been recently demonstrated, leading to the use of mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccines. mRNA vaccines can induce potent immune responses without the need of translocation into the cell nucleus. Furthermore, mRNA manufacturing can be optimized to be low-cost, fully synthetic and scalable. However, rapid, low-cost, global deployment of these vaccine, and nanomedicines in general, requires new manufacturing technologies. Consequently, vaccine developers need to understand of the impact of these manufacturing processes on nanoparticle characteristics and potency. 

Join Professor Yvonne Perrie, from the University of Strathclyde's Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, as she shows you the scale-independent manufacture of these particles using microfluidics. She will also explore the role of formulation, using a range of nanoparticle systems, on critical attributes such as:

• particle size distribution

• polydispersity

• zeta potential

Professor Perrie is an internationally recognized expert in the field of liposomes and particulate drug delivery research, Professor Perrie’s research focuses on the development of drug delivery systems for drugs and vaccines, providing practical solutions for current healthcare problems. Overseeing a laboratory fully equipped for the manufacture and analysis of a wide range of nanoparticles, and to date has translated her research into 6 patents and approximately 130 peer-reviewed articles. Her research and academic leadership have been recognized via a range of fellowships and awards, including, most recently, the Royal Pharmaceutical Society Harrison Memorial Medal (2019).